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  • Writer's pictureCraig Norris

From Spectrograms to Superman

Episode 69 - With host Craig Norris and cohost Taylor Lidstone.
First Broadcast on Edge Radio, 22nd March 2024.


Exploring the world of gaming, where DOOM, the classic FPS, has been transformed into an audio spectrogram experience. We navigate the complex legal skies of anime streaming. The legendary Macross series is finally landing on Disney+, but not without its caveats. Step into the past with us as we discuss the restoration of the iconic 1940s Superman shorts by Fleischer Studios. Ending with the tale of Leonard Teale, who brought Superman to life on Australian radio in the late '40s. We’ll delve into the history of this unique adaptation and its significance in Australian pop culture.





This episode was first Broadcast on Edge Radio 99.3FM on 22nd March 2024.


Links

This is What Happens When You Play DOOM on an Audio Spectrogram - TechEBlog https://www.techeblog.com/play-doom-audio-spectrogram-sound-waves/


Macross Is Coming to Disney+, With Some Major Caveats https://gizmodo.com/macross-streaming-disney-plus-robotech-harmony-gold-1851344628


Fleischer Cartoons Enter the Modern Age with Restored Superman Shorts https://gizmodo.com/superman-fleischer-cartoons-restoration-1851342887


FIGHTING THE FORCES OF EVIL ON 2GB RADIO https://www.nfsa.gov.au/latest/meet-aussie-superman


3 Ways To Open A Story - Jonathan Blum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3no2un4Elik


 

Listen live to “Media Mothership” every Friday 4-5pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time) via YouTube, Twitch, and Edge Radio.


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TRANSCRIPT

This is an AI-generated transcript of the audio and it may contain errors. We may update or correct this transcript in the future. Please contact us if you have any questions about the information in this transcript. The audio is the official record of this episode.


CRAIG NORRIS

Yes, you are now listening to media mothership here on Edge Radio 99.3. Him.

Speaker 2

OK.

CRAIG NORRIS

Yeah, I mean I I had all the buttons on but the wrong faders up. So you're listening.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

You could have just blamed the like the the aerial or something you could have done anything, but instead you took the brunt of the blame.

CRAIG NORRIS

That's a learning experience, so this is media mothership. I'm your host Doctor Craig, joined by co-host Lord Taylor. Yeah, we're broadcasting.

Speaker 2

Yes.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

That's Co host not got host as it sounded like you said.

CRAIG NORRIS

Got host. We're broadcasting out of Edge Radio Studios, these multimillion dollar. Equipment research. Level. Technology in Nepal, Luna, Hobart. TAS.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

This is an interesting thing because I always notice that you say Edge radio studios. Where's the other studio? I happen to say what is the production booth upstairs? OK, yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

Potentially. And it is theatre of the mind. I mean, the theatre of the mind. That's saying Edge Radio Studios creates, I think is now.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

MHM. M.

CRAIG NORRIS

Awful magic of media. I mean, you could look at us right now on the stream. So we're streaming on YouTube and Twitch. I think hopefully, I'm pretty sure we're streaming on YouTube and Twitch, so you can find that by going to media mothership and see the actual interior of the studio, people who have watched Rose Haven. That will recognise the studio as the one that was used in the Rose Haven. ABC TV comedy Community Radio.

Speaker

Hmm.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Station and of course, you were the star. Of that TV show as well, weren't you?

CRAIG NORRIS

I do run little tours here so they can see it at a small charge. Yeah, I don't do that because I don't think anyone come. But it is funny to have a bit of media, you know, magic here in the studio that.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Yeah. Just interested did they clean up before they filmed or?

CRAIG NORRIS

Look, you can they. They changed the studio in some dramatic. Ways. OK, right.

Speaker

Nice.

CRAIG NORRIS

They kept the a lot of it is very recognisable. This is still all this, so the the computers, the panel for those that can't see can run a radio, the CD players and so forth you can see but they are.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Hmm.

CRAIG NORRIS

They blocked out these these glass areas.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

OK. Yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

It's worth what you've never you've.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Never seen it? No, never, never, never.

CRAIG NORRIS

So what do we do here on media mothership, we explore how media can shape our understanding of the world around us, usually through news. Usually I'm digging up interest in news. Articles, so let's. Let's go straight into.

Speaker 4

Are you defined by the binary oppositions? Ever doubt a life of stable meaning want to trace it all? Edge Radio doesn't just offer you media. We offer you media mothership.

CRAIG NORRIS

Bronstein.

Speaker 4

Media mothership designed to reveal the aporias of the day for one hour of difference. Yeah. What are you waiting for? Hop on the media mothership.

Speaker

It's pretty good.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

I just looked over at the thing and thought it was like 18 minutes 18 seconds remaining. I knew it would just be torturous for the entire 18 seconds.

CRAIG NORRIS

Torturous. I mean, that was media mothership production that remixed the classic Golden Age of Hollywood of Radios escape series.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Oh yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

But put me mothership in there. That indeed the second half of today's show, Taylor will probably escape and leave to do an interview, and we will deep dive into a little bit.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

I will.

Speaker

I will.

CRAIG NORRIS

Of golden radio. Drama, The Australian version of Superman that's coming up later in this hour. But first, let's look at the news first story is this is what happens when you play doom on an audio spectrogram. Fantastic. So it is. Mentioned this a few weeks. There we go. And we've been looking at most weeks at how doom the video game doom from the 90s can be played on all manner of things. So this story is talking about how. Via audio you can get what's called a wad file. UM and it will create a A you need then software that's capable of generating a live spectrogram. To view the games output.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

So. So. So, do you know what? A spectrogram is. Is it like a waveform? It. Yeah, it kind of is. So each sort of like pitching of a note equates to what's shown on there. As you can see on the thing there. So like with darker ones or ones closer together etcetera, things like that.

CRAIG NORRIS

Right. Yeah, cause it's really amazing here. Ohh yeah, I think I've used audio software. Mm-hmm. And. And one of them had this bizarre coloured pattern.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Yeah, yeah, it's not. It's not specifically a waveform that you see when like you important or yeah or something like that. Yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

Yeah, look like predator vision. Like it was heat, but OK, so it's basically translating audio sound into a visual form that then you can manipulate to get a better sounding audio piece of work. Yeah, but in this case, they've been able to put the Doom game into audio that then if you run software that can. Captured as a spectrogram, you see the doom level. You know the guy with the gun shooting it out. So what we're going to do is just play the microphone input. Fantastic. So if anyone there is listening, they could, you know, open up their spectrogram software now and see doom. For those that don't have spectrogram software installed on their FM car system or computer.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Just your imagination.

CRAIG NORRIS

Use your imagination. What we're going to hear is a lot of distorted buzzing and some high pitched squeals and squawks.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Yep. Then we'll hear the Doom audio.

CRAIG NORRIS

That will be me talking now that it will be all Doom audio and some of those. High pitched squeals. If you have the image, you'll see is probably when they're hitting a keyboard button to move the view to a different spot. To move your characters. Field division. Anyway, let's listen to it now. This is the WD audio file. That can be then converted into a visual audio. Thing thing, diagram, image spectrogram through spectrogram. Yeah, OK, here we go. Here we go. There, there it is.

Speaker

Ohh so.

CRAIG NORRIS

So those kind of high pit squeals? Is, I think putting inputs in like you're you're you're you're selecting your character now, and now you're loading into. Jane. And you're setting it up. Bit high pitched for my lucky. Ohh, hold on. Oops. Alright. Well, you've pressed on something else. Alright, so yes, that's that was the doom. I'll. I'll just leave that. Just click on some other in there. In the background. While we're talking, it sounds a bit.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Like a dial-up modem, it does a bit, yeah. I like how you just turned that down and it made absolutely no difference.

CRAIG NORRIS

Yeah, I don't know what frequency that's at. I'm sure dogs are barking now. Well, it's interesting, isn't it, when you have a visual? Well, Doom has audio and visual, but when you convert it into only audio, it's inconceivable to think that this is a first person shooter game.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Hmm yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

In any way. So that's that. That's really blew me away because normally people are playing doom like on a a lawn mower. But it'll be on the the.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

The screen, yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

The. Black screen for a a high tech lawnmower or a tractor or something, or watch. You won't have anything on audio, right? But then you you can convert it to see what it is.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

With the spectrogram. But The thing is just that audio itself is someone playing or doomed.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

For spectrogram and then into like a emulating yeah, database. What our voices would have added to that.

CRAIG NORRIS

That's true. Couple of purple and orange tones that we've seen. Well, you know, I think we could do a broadcast purely in this format, squeals and squeaks and then convert it back to an audiogram thing.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

OK. Yep.

CRAIG NORRIS

On an upcoming show I have been starting to look into how the minds pleasure chemicals, what I call them pleasure, chemicals, serotonin, serotonin or dopamine are linked to music. There's been some really interesting music. So coming up. I'm not gonna press the. The thing I don't know what it's queued up to.

Speaker

Did it.

CRAIG NORRIS

Nice. So next news story is Macross. Japanese anime. I find this fascinating. So Macross, of course, was is a Japanese anime. It basically features two really interesting aspects to its storytelling, so it's from the 80s, and it was translated and adapted. Is the West and relabeled as Robotech, and it drew upon three different, unrelated anime that they squashed together to create one new.

Speaker

MHM.

CRAIG NORRIS

Anime series called Robotech.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Used in America.

CRAIG NORRIS

No. In Australia throughout all the non Japanese. OK. Yeah, had it. So we got it in Australia, Robotech, we never got Macross, we got Robotech. Robotech uses season one of Robotech is the first season of Macross and season 2 of Robotech is Southern Star Squadron, I think. And then season three, it's all science fiction.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

How does that work? Are the characters are the characters?

Speaker 5

Are.

CRAIG NORRIS

They they like. So at the end of like Macross basically tells a story of an alien invasion where an alien spaceship crashes on Earth. We don't realise there's an alien. Well, it's not an invasion. There's an outside of Earth. There's this alien battle going on. Spaceship crashes on earth. We don't know what's going on. Decades past we figure out what the technology is. We build this. We kind of rebuild part of the ship, launch it and it triggers battles with these. Of course, yeah. And and it's got great mecha designs. So some of the fighters were based on the Tomcats. So. So yeah, really cool. What I love about Macross and Robotech is that it combines both kind of action aeroplanes and a lot of singing. You'd like this for Kpop. So much idol singing in.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

This. Oh yeah, I would.

CRAIG NORRIS

Like it theory of what I really found. Fascinating about how they defeat the aliens is that if I remember correctly, the Zentradi aliens had removed culture from their life. And so there was not music or love anymore with his entire community. And at the end they figured out that if if they had an idol singer start singing, it would actually hack into the programming and minds of these aliens because they couldn't handle the J Pop Idol singing. Like so, there's always singing that goes on as as a weaponized attack. Fantastic. These others?

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

That reminds me of what's it called? Not GTA, but the one that's like GTA.

CRAIG NORRIS

You know aliens.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Sounds right. OK. Thanks for I think for where they've got the dubstep gun.

Speaker

Yeah.

CRAIG NORRIS

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean I what I like about when music enters a pop culture action space combat space is that it's really that soft power idea. Right. So you've got on one hand hard power. So you've literally got military grade guns and weapons and spaceships.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Combat. Within.

CRAIG NORRIS

And fighter fighter jets that are shooting and killing and then in Macross you also have soft power, literally cultural power. In this case singing. You know J pop Electro beat music that then has an immediate effect on the aliens where not only you know again we were talking about how music can release dopamine and serotonin and other chemicals in the mind. No, not cocaine in this series it can then. Actually kind of change the Jeff to leave, you know. Anyway really cool anyway, so anyway, the big thing with Macross is that it seems to be finally coming to Disney because of the fact that went through Robotech. It meant that macros could never get released in the West because the licencing deal with. The distributor of Robotech but but finally it seems that everything except for that foundational series that got taken up into Robotech will be coming to the West in some form. Right? And and Disney seems to.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

MHM.

CRAIG NORRIS

Be part of.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Spectrogram.

CRAIG NORRIS

The spectrogram that would be quite interesting. Yeah, the the macro series has continued over those decades that it was never released in the West because of the restrictions that harmony gold that's them had placed on for the global market because at the.

Speaker

Hmm.

CRAIG NORRIS

But finally it seems some arrangements made so celebration.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

Celebration.

CRAIG NORRIS

Celebration. Alright, well, thank you Taylor. Moving on to now, yeah, you might be.

TAYLOR LIDSTONE

I might be back later, but yeah. Bye everyone.

CRAIG NORRIS

Theatre of the mind. Now I want to do is move on to the second part, which is basically setting up a bit of a deep dive into classic radio dramas and what we're going to explore firstly is Superman. So it turns out that Superman was adapted. Into Australia back in 1949. So of course it first premiered as a comic book series in 1938 in America. Then it did make its way onto radio in the US. But in 1949 it was adapted to Australia, so we're going to listen to is part of the first episode from the 1949 Australian Radio Series Superman. We're going to unpack a little bit about what an act one structure is, whether this still holds up today. How the adaptation works coming from such a distinctive American property Superman to an Australian property. Before we go any further, though, I want to set it up by looking a little bit about what the first episode of any series is meant to do, what the heavy lifting it's meant to do. So as we're listening to it, we can think. Is this working? So here's a little clip from film Courage with a green play script writer Naomi Batty, talking about what an act one needs to do.

Speaker

What is the purpose of act one?

Speaker 6

Well, act one gives us all of the context that we need in order to understand the story that we're about to watch and understand. You know, it it basically sets up The Who wants what of of your movie. So you know, if we look at each. Movie as being a story of someone wants something. Once it badly, you know, goes after it against big conflict, great opposition. Then act one sets up all of those pieces. Right? So it tells us who it tells us what they want. It tells us why they want it, and it tells us what they're up against. So all of those pieces, that sort of create the foundation of the story or that. Like story engine that we were talking about earlier, that's what act one does. It sets up all of those things so that when we launch into act two or that like Act 2 adventure, you might have. Is it called when we begin that we have all of the information that we need in order to understand who are we watching? What are they trying to do? What are they up against? You know, why do they want it so badly? Like all of that's been established so that we can just watch everything escalate in act two, does that make?

Speaker

Sense it does. And.

CRAIG NORRIS

So what we're going to listen to now is episode one of the 1949 Superman series and. Let's see what it's setting up. You know who? What, when, why, where. How so, who's who's in this scene? What are they doing? What seems to be the drama that's playing out? And we'll we'll we'll see how it how it shapes up as a piece of work. So again, this is 1949. The Australian version of Superman. Also see if you can hear an Australian accent here. It'll be interesting. Of course, in 1949 the radio BBC voice still dominated how Australian airwaves thought of a good radio voice, so I assume it's probably going to sound. A little bit. BBC Australia if you can understand that, but maybe some Australian twinks, certainly no American hard R's and whatnot.

Speaker 7

A new exciting radio programme featuring the thrilling adventures of an amazing and incredible personality faster than an aeroplane, more powerful than a locomotive, Superman. Superman, a being no larger than an ordinary man but possessed of powers and abilities. Never before realised on Earth. Able to leap into the air an eighth of a mile at a. Single. Bound. Hurtle A twenty Storey building with ease, race a high powered bullet to its target, lift tremendous weights and rend solid steel in his bare hands as though it were. Superman, a strange visitor from a distant planet, champion of the oppressed physical Marvel Extraordinary, who has sworn to devote his existence on Earth to helping those in need.

CRAIG NORRIS

I'll just pause it there. It's interesting to hear the type of. Abilities that Superman has at this point in his history, so we're really talking here about the 1930s.

Speaker

Or an age Superman.

CRAIG NORRIS

Sorry, I just paused that now the 1930s Golden Age Superman that we're hearing really being broadcast here in 49. So we've got not yet the ability to fly. It appears he can only leap over tall buildings. He certainly has super strength. And super speed and invulnerability, but not yet, it appears to be some of those other abilities which developed in certainly the 50s and the Silver Age of Superman. That's the superheroing flying without needing to do a jump. Kryptonite. Don't think has been introduced yet for Superman. I know that kryptonite is certainly introduced through the Radio Series first rather than the comic series, so it is interesting again what ability Superman has in 1949. So now going back to. This series.

Speaker 7

Superman, a being no larger than an ordinary man but possessed of powers and abilities. Never before realised on Earth. Able to leap into the air an eighth of a mile at a single bound. Hurtle A twenty Storey building with ease, raise a high powered bullet to its target, lift tremendous weights and rend solid steel in his bare hands as though it were paper. Superman, a strange visitor from a distant planet, champion of the oppressed physical marvel. Extraordinary who has sworn to devote his existence. On Earth, to helping those in need. As our story begins, we ask you to come with us on a fire journey, a journey that takes us millions of miles from the earth where the planet Krypton burns like a green star in the endless heavens. Here, civilization is far advanced. It has brought forth a race of supermen, men and women like ourselves. But advanced to the absolute peak of human perfection. As we near Krypton, we see high walls and gleaming turrets. We approached the magnificent temple of wisdom and there in a Great Hall. Jarrell Kryptonians, foremost men of science, is about to address a meeting of the planets governing house.

Speaker 2

Attention attention, gentlemen.

Speaker 5

Jerrell speaks members of the Council. I have completed my solar calculations. And much as I dread uttering these words. I have come to the conclusion Krypton is doom. Did I hear him right? Gentlemen. Gentlemen, hear him out. These internal quakes we have been experiencing these volcanic eruptions. Tidal waves, gas escaping from giant craters all point to only one thing. Krypton is utterly and finally doomed.

Speaker 2

One moment, gentlemen. One moment. There is no cause for anxiety. OK. I am certain Jarrell has made a mistake. True, we have had a few minor quakes and eruptions, but nothing very serious. There must be some error in your calculations durette.

Speaker 5

No, no, there is no error Roseanne. I only wish there were. The sun is gradually drawing Krypton closer to it. Within a month, possibly a week, the gravitational pull will be so tremendous that Krypton will not be able to weather the strain and then then our planet will explode like a giant bubble destroying every living thing on it.

Speaker 2

Gentlemen, assuming for the moment, Jerrell, that what you say is true, how are we to avoid it? What can we do to?

Speaker 5

Stop it. There is only one way. As you all know, I have been working on a spaceship designed for interplanetary.

Speaker 7

Well.

Speaker 5

With time and united effort, we might transport the entire population of Krypton to another world. Impossible. Where would we go to the earth? My studies tell me the atmosphere of the earth is very nearly the same as. Our own you.

Speaker 2

Have been working too hard jarelle you need to rest. Believe me, we have the utmost respect for your knowledge and integrity. But this is carrying it too far. Planets as large as Krypton do not explode. You're in. Wait.

Speaker 5

Do you hear that? It is the forewarning of doom. Every moment is precious. Now quakes like that are sounding the death knell of Krypton. It will happen, gentlemen, and happen soon. And when the last day of eruption.

Speaker 2

Comes when it comes Jarrell, it shall find us all ready. If Krypton is to die. We shall die with it. The parting would be much too severe.

Speaker 5

Very well. Laugh, laugh if you like Roseanne and you, members of the Council.

Speaker

So.

Speaker 5

I have no time to laugh. My wife Lara, and my infant son are dear to me. It is not my wish to stand by and see them destroyed, laugh, laugh, all of you. But the time will come and the time is perhaps very close at hand when you will wish you had heeded the words of jorel. Now you think me a fool. But remember what I have said. When Krypton is shattered to 1000 million stars, when the glorious civilization we have built is no more. When you and your families are swept from the face of Krypton like dust.

Speaker 2

Order. Order, gentlemen. Order. You have heard Yourell speak. Is it your wish that we devote time and money to the building of spaceships for the transportation of crypton's population to another planet? I am sorry, Jerrell. The Council has spoken. Yes.

Speaker 5

And signed the death warrant of every living thing on Krypton. Well, I've done my best to convince you now all that remains for me is to proceed with my own means of salvation. My own spaceship. To save the lives of those near and dear to me. As for the rest of you. May the gods have mercy on your soul.

CRAIG NORRIS

May the gods have mercy on your soul, so this is halfway through the first episode, 6 minutes and 30 into it. 12 minutes and turtle. It's interesting here. Obviously, act one of the 1949 Australian Radio series Superman. Is very close to. What we remember from Sumanth act one, we've got kryptonite. Crew got Krypton Planet, Home Planet of Superman. That is about to be. Destroyed. It's about to have a natural calamity before that, to its absolute destruction, very timely, in a way, given the contemporary worries around climate change. Today, in our world, to hear debates around climate change happening with. Tripped on in the Superman story. Fascinatingly, here we hear Jarrell Supermans's father proposing the plan of building as many spaceships as they can because he's found a planet that can sustain. Kryptonians, that is Earth. So he's proposing an exodus from Krypton to earth for all people of Krypton. So again I can't recall if that's the origin story of Krypton's destruction. There where the earth was proposed as as a as a planned escape route that Darrell was making. Certainly the Council will reject that plan and reject the idea that Crypton is about to explode, as is the way of the the original story. So it's it's skewing as an adaption very close to that first act. One of the emotional impact that we later on see Superman struggling with as he recognises from this first scene that we're witnessing the destruction of Krypton. And we'll see now how it builds towards the escape. How does it develop next in the second half of Act one, where we have some foundations being laid around a Weld under threats. Into near collapse, but everyone. Denying that and then Jarrell's decision to save hopefully himself and his wife and son. Let's see if that happens in this version of the Superman Act from 1949 in Australia.

Speaker 5

Oh. A lotta I didn't see you.

Speaker 8

I came out to take the air on the terrace. It's been terribly hot all day. Is that because we're being drawn to the sun jorel? Yes. What did the Council have to say about? That I.

Speaker 5

I didn't mention it.

Speaker 8

Is the model of your spaceship almost finished?

Speaker 5

Yes, yes, I just drove the last rivet. How does it look?

Speaker 8

Splendid. But will it work?

Speaker 5

That remains to be seen. If it does work, I shall immediately begin construction of another, just like it only much larger, one big enough to carry all three of us to.

Speaker 8

Another world, every moment that we spend waiting and wondering. And when will that?

Speaker 5

Yes, yes, I know. I know, Laura. It's been hard on all of us. And particularly hard on you. How's the boys?

Speaker 8

Sleeping. That quake this afternoon frightened him, but he's all right now. Can't you come in and look? At him, you. Scarcely. See him these days, what with working all hours on the spaceship model.

Speaker 5

It can't be helped. Here. I'm racing against time. Right now I'm anxious to know whether the model will behave.

Speaker 8

As I hope how does it operate?

Speaker 5

Very simply. When all is ready, I throw this switch. That closes the circuit and electric energy builds up pressure in the atomic generators. Then, at the final moment, the pressure forces the ship from its carrier and speeds it on its way.

Speaker 8

But where does it?

Speaker 5

Go wherever it's pointed. This one I'm directing to the planet Earth.

Speaker 2

Earth.

Speaker 8

What is that jorelle?

Speaker 5

A planet smaller than our own, situated on the other side of. The sun. It's inhabited by a race of people similar to ourselves.

Speaker 8

Like ourselves.

Speaker 5

Only partly, of course, my dear. That about the same size, but nowhere nearly as.

Speaker 8

Developed.

Speaker 5

Very weak and helpless. And and with all their faculties extremely limited.

Speaker 8

Well, how do you mean?

Speaker 5

Well, I I haven't time to go into a detailed explanation now, Laura, but it's something like this. You know how far you step when you want to.

Speaker 8

Go somewhere practically as far as I want to. Why one step takes me to Brazil's house near the fountain.

Speaker 5

Exactly. Well, down where I'm sending the spaceship, it's quite different. An Earthman steps only three feet at a time at most, and and everything else is in proportion.

Speaker 8

And that's where we're going. Oh, how dreadful.

Speaker 5

My dear, which would you rather do? Go to earth and live. Or stay on Krypton and. Die.

Speaker 8

I'll do anything you say. Torell, anything. It doesn't matter to me whether we live or die, so long as we're together. It's only the boy I worry.

Speaker 5

About yes, I know. Oh, Laura, darling, don't worry. You'll be saved.

Speaker 8

When you're testing the spaceship model.

Speaker 5

In the morning, just as dawn breaks out, send it on its way. How did you hear that?

Speaker 9

Yes.

Speaker 5

Yes. What is it? Subterranean explosions. Do you feel the ground trembling?

Speaker 8

Yes, I do. Do you think?

Speaker 5

Laura, I'm afraid it's come. Where does the boy kill? What do you mean? Get him quickly. This is.

Speaker 8

The end, Joel. What?

Speaker 5

Can we do nothing? Nothing. I'm not ready. No. What a fool I've been.

Speaker 9

To the lake. It isn't your fault. You did all you could. If only this mother were.

Speaker 5

Large enough we could take a chance.

Speaker 8

Would it carry one of us safely to Earth?

Speaker 5

Oh, I think so. But Lara, Lara, where are you going? Stay here with. Me.

Speaker 9

I'm getting kalel if one of us can be saved, it should be the boy.

Speaker 5

No, no. Lara, come back. If one must go into. To you, Laura, I said. Come back, come back.

CRAIG NORRIS

All right. So just to interrupt the Superman Australian Radio series episode 1 from 1949, in terms of adaptations from America to Australia, it seems to be staying very close to the fidelity of the original source material. But we have the collapse now of Krypton as. Is is always established in Superman Act One stories where Krypton it destroys itself, so it appears as if we're on the brink of destruction. Interestingly, here the people who live on Krypton are already superpowered. There's a great dialogue where Jarrell and his wife are talking about. How far it takes them to walk somewhere and she said. Oh well, I I can bound within one step to the, you know, neighbours park all the way over there. Yet later on, I think that that idea of the kryptonite is being super powered, already gets changed so that it's when they arrive and different gravity, the sun, the yellow sun. Giving Superman his power. But apart from that, yeah, it seems that again, there's still figuring out the rules of Superman. I guess at this time in 1949, some of the more established rules that we then see get further codified through the movies. In particular, are still to come. But we can hear maybe a little bit of Australian twang. You know, I I do feel this is this has trace elements of of an Australian vocal performance so. So there is a little bit of adaptation going on here. Let's here the the last few minutes now as we'll see how Superman, how Clark Kent. Well, to become Clark can escape. The collapse of crypto.

Speaker 9

Here he is still asleep. Goodbye, Kayla.

Speaker 5

He's louder.

Speaker 8

No channel. Listen to me. We both stay here. Kalel goes in the spaceship. If there's a chance Jorel 1. Little chance. I want it for my son.

Speaker 5

Perhaps you're right.

Speaker 9

You're right. Look, look at the sky. It's fiery red. And the mountains. Look, the mountains are falling in what's happening?

Speaker 5

The end of Krypton, Lara, just as I foretold. This is the last great quake.

Speaker 9

Listen.

Speaker 5

Here quick quick give me the.

Speaker 9

Boy, OK. OK, what are you?

Speaker 5

Doing Johnny opening the door, putting him inside.

Speaker 9

The house. The house. It's swaying. It's breaking. Apart. Look, John.

Speaker 5

There, there, he's safe inside. Now for the. Switch. Stand back louder.

Speaker 9

Ohh Jorel, will it reach the?

Speaker 5

Earth only the gods know, but there's a chance the only chance. Stand back now. Lara, I'm going to throw the switch.

Speaker 9

What's stopping the spaceship and why doesn't it go?

Speaker 5

He's waiting for pressure or we may have been too late. If it doesn't work up soon. Now that it's off, it's on its way. Now listen. Can you hear me? Our boy kennel. Our son, Lara. Lara. He's on his way on his way to Earth.

CRAIG NORRIS

Right, 1949.

Speaker 7

Though the tiny rocket ship roared into the unchartered heavens as the mighty planet of Krypton explodes into millions of glowing fragments, glittering stars to remain forever in. The night sky. Jarrell and Lara's devoted parents of the tiny boy perish in the giant quake that destroys Krypton. But what of the rocket? Ship. Does it reach Earth? Does it find its mark in all the far flung darkness of space? Remember, don't miss the next installment of. Superman.

CRAIG NORRIS

Not a fan of the whistle, but 1949 this came out. So really interesting moment in terms of that history. Close that now history Australia was experiencing then you know, I mean it's it's fascinating. That Superman in 1949 that's becoming incredibly popular through this radio drama in Australia. Many people would say that we have this emergence of Australian identity going on during that time that this adaptation of Superman in 1949 is coming around a time when Australia's starting to separate more from its British colonial roots and starting to establish a stronger. National identity of a Turn 1, which is as time would pass more aligned with the. Yes. So we also have this idea of post war optimism and innovation that's going on in post World War 2 Australia. During this time, a lot of adaptations of US pop culture, Superman being one of them. But other superheroes also being adapted into Australia. So it's interesting to hear. Here, though, with the Australian voice, it's it's localization, and it'll be interesting. We'll play a few episodes in upcoming episodes of Media Mothership. How that might make more local changes, it's certainly very child friendly entertainment. There's an article about this from the national film and Sound Archive of Australia talking about the Superman series from 49, particularly the. Performance that we'll hear next week when we listen to an episode by Brisbane native Leonard Teal, who's best remembered in Australia for many for his performance from the TV cop series Homicide. But he he was playing Superman next. And became incredibly one of his very popular roles as as Superman, so there's. 1040 episodes made of this so certainly very popular. Each episode was 15 minutes and they aired Monday to Thursdays at 6:30 PM so yeah, prime time listening. Slots for people it was on Sydney's radio station 2GB. I'm not sure if it ever broadcasted anywhere beyond that, but certainly Sydney's radio station 2GB GB, has some ads on. It. There are some scripts that the national film and sound. Archive of Australia have for it in terms of actual episodes, it seems there's only four that are circulating in any way. You can listen to today. There's. The first two episodes, episode one. Just heard in episode 2 that we'll analyse next week and then two further episodes. I think episode 146 or something and 1:47 that we might have time to listen to later. So a lot of it seems lost and obviously quite incomplete given there were over 1000 episodes. Made 50 minutes each, so the synopsis of the series reads an adventure radio series for children. This American inspired series was based on the exploits of Superman, a superhero who's real identities. Clark Kent, reporter for the newspaper Daily planet. So they've definitely kept to the current. Late 40s version of Superman that became an established in the US where. Where we have the newspaper daily planets, we have his identity. Next week, though, there's some changes, right in terms of the typical story of client can't act. One is, as we've heard here, escapes from Krypton, which establishes this emotional impact. He has that he's an immigrant, he's an escapee from a kind of disaster for his homeland. Then we have these ideas of character and myths that get established in those first other episodes where it's taken in by the Kents to raise, and you know very much become this kind of humble us. Citizen. But yeah, is that the case in Episode 2, we'll, we'll, we'll check that out. What's also interesting in terms of this work as an adaptation is how it was integrated into the series. There's a news story that was published. In 10th of March 1949, just as this was being released, which kind of gives a hint into the excitement, I guess around Superman at that time. So to quote from this news story, it says Superman, the recently acquired Aww 6:00. So the time slot it's in not only makes a better radio serial than a newspaper. Trip. At that stage, of course, Superman was serialised in newspapers. It would also become collected in comic books, but certainly early on in its history it was a serialised newspaper strip. Sort of continue with the Australian news story. So goes on to say, but it was more healthy for children than most of the cereals currently broadcast. So again, Superman being seen as a for parents, a healthy choice for children to listen to compared to other cereals, I guess you might have had Buck Rogers Flash born also at that. Time. So the story goes on. Of course. Magnetic friend Clark Kent still performs miracles, but then you expect that sort of thing in Superman. And it merely seems part of the fun. It is also a fantastic. It is also so fantastic as to present no worry to mothers with sensitive youngsters. Great, so it gets. You know AG rating, so certainly aimed at kids. Though you know. Heavy going, the destruction of cryptum in act one. I mean, it's certainly I think still timely as it was then in terms of the dangers. Of not being alert for changing climate conditions, science trying to provide the best solutions for addressing problems. I mean, yeah, I think cautionary tale. So here we have now act one getting established, interesting again thinking about it being adapted into. Australia, American piece of pop culture, but very much could be seen as part of that post war emergent Australian identity, leaving the British colonial roots behind and adapting its kind of newfound cultural impacts from the US. So so really interesting to consider in that way. Obviously, in terms of an Act one, it's a little weak because we're all very familiar with the story of crypto being destroyed. We have the parents being the only roles that are really the central focus of this. The protagonists, yeah. Jarrell. The father building, trying to get the Council to agree that there's a problem with crypto and building the spaceship side to send it off. Interesting. The role of the mother here. That she's the one that decides that it should be. The sun. That gets sent, not her to survive the destruction of Krypton. That kalel the son kept said so again. You know the mother taking some agency there rather than the father who doesn't really have any well, wants realises. I guess that he hasn't had enough time. Hasn't really thought. About who's going to go in this spaceship. And obviously the mother steps in and says well, it's so small, it's got to be the baby and but pretty consistent given this came out in 1949, consistent in terms of how even the later movies Man of Steel establishes the same thing. Krypton, Superman's dad Jerrell, the conflict with the council. The rejection of his science, him deciding to send. Complete the spaceship. Interestingly, in this case it's the mother that sends Superman off or kalal. So yeah, interesting. What's also interesting about the Superman origin stories? Of course, as many people have observed, it shares a lot of similarities to the biblical story of Moses, which is fascinating to consider. So of course Moses was placed in the basket. By his mother when it was decided by the pharaoh that he was. Going to kill all. Boys, Jewish boys. So the mother sent Moses down the Nile in the baskets to be rescued by. Was it farrahs daughter? I think. And that shares some similarity. The idea that. Jerrell sends his son. In this spaceship, to escape the destruction of Krypton, just like Moses was. So again, many people draw that analogy. The. You know, some people also see an analogy with Jesus that the fathers. You know, giving his his son to save the world like God with Jesus. So again, you know, it's interesting. Zack Snyder's Man of Steel has a lot of parallels with Jesus. So fascinating to consider the type of religious iconography that's getting. Consumer within this, of course, the creators of Superman. Were both Jewish? So they were certainly integrating their own uprising and myths. They've been engaged in, so maybe not surprising that it replicates some aspects of the story of Moses. With Superman escaping Krypton. So quite fascinating to consider those changes. So again, in terms of an act one, it establishes a lot. People can kind of see within this religious allegories of supermans role, the escape from a a dying exploding culture. Him now in episode 2 that we'll listen to next week becoming. An immigrant trying to see how he survives on Earth. And you know what role Krypton plays within? That would be interesting to to see often in terms of act one, it lacks. Superman appearing. So it'll be interesting to see how episode two tries and creates that interesting sound effects like everything except the whistle, the explosions again, great theatre of the mind. So I'll put up some show notes if people are interested. The radio version of this has been. UM. Preserved through the national film and Sound Archive of Australia, and you can check that out on their SoundCloud page as well. There's some really fascinating articles about this moment of history where. Australia had an incredibly popular. Version of Superman that was produced in Australia by Australians in 1949 became incredibly popular. Had over 1000 episodes AD only in Sydney, it seems so fantastic to have brought that now finally to the airwaves of Hobart and the world through our digital stream. And act one pretty much in lockstep with the mothership of Superman. So again, if you are curious to know more about the Australian version of Superman from 1949, I'll post show notes up on the podcast. Episodes as well as on the show notes via YouTube. You. You can also listen to previous episodes on edge radios, websites, and on Twitch as well. Next week we'll look a little bit further about adapting Superman into 1950s Australia through looking at a couple of other episodes. We'll unpack how act ones can develop. We'll have a look at how the adaptation of Superman into Australia took some changes from the version that we know today. And whether those were good or bad. So if you've enjoyed the show, please subscribe to the show via podcast or by YouTube. Check out further information on Facebook or Instagram for media membership. Coming up eventually, once Taylor finishes his interview with the comedian will be key pop unlimited that there might even be a chance to listen to some of the interview content. He's. Done. Which will be intriguing. So keep listening now to Edge radio. 99.3 FM coming up. Next we've got. Good grief by Teddy.

 

 

 

 


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